[PHOTOS] The Integrated Cancer Center almost ready

The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC), at the heart of the megahospital under construction in Quebec City, will welcome its first patients next week.

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It is from Tuesday that the CIC will officially begin its activities, which means the departure of nearly 500 employees of the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, over the next few months, to the Maizerets district.


The Integrated Cancer Center of Quebec, located in the Maizerets district, will be able to welcome its first patients from next week.

Photo Diane Tremblay

The Integrated Cancer Center of Quebec, located in the Maizerets district, will be able to welcome its first patients from next week.

This is the most recent building to be delivered in the entire project, whose construction costs have risen from $1.9 billion to $2.2 billion. In addition to the consequences of the current pandemic, the main critical care building has been adapted to deal with a future pandemic, which has led to modifications and additions, particularly to the ventilation systems.

“We have had discussions with the government. The project has obtained the necessary government authorizations for the update,” explained Christine Mimeault, Deputy Director General of the CHU. The CIC alone is valued at nearly $300 million.

“We wanted to make it as human as possible,” said Mme Mimeault.


The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC) on the site of the Enfant-Jésus Hospital

Particular emphasis has been placed on bringing natural light into the building, which is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for cancer patients. “It doesn’t look like a hospital,” she added.


The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC) on the site of the Enfant-Jésus Hospital

The CIC brings together the main specialized and superspecialized outpatient services offered in oncology at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval.


The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC) on the site of the Enfant-Jésus Hospital

The integration of clinical activities, combined with the addition of four radiation oncology treatment devices, for a total of 14, will make it possible to offer nearly 39,000 additional oncology consultations and more than 6,000 hematology-oncology treatments more annually.

Stage 2

Several buildings of phase 1 of the megahospital have already been delivered. Phase 2 is well underway with the construction of the critical care building which will rise to 11 floors.


The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC) on the site of the Enfant-Jésus Hospital

The construction of the megahospital was stopped for seven weeks during the first wave of COVID-19.

“There were a lot of specialized equipment purchases going on all over the world. All of this has created delays,” notes Robert Topping, general manager of the new hospital complex project office for the Société québécoise des infrastructures.


The Integrated Cancer Center (CIC) on the site of the Enfant-Jésus Hospital

Some deadlines had to be readjusted to take this reality into account. The end of construction of the critical care building has been changed from 2023 to the end of 2024. In addition, there is a period of another 9 to 18 months for the repair of premises and equipment.

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